Sunday, September 22, 2013

Freaky Friday

*This post contains doll nudity and adult situations.  Reader discretion is advised.

 

Every Friday after school Carmilla likes to stop by her favorite Die-ner for a snack.


"What will you have today?" asks Vertrice, the waitress.


"The usual."

 

"Here you are Carmilla.  Bone apetit!"


Mattel's Monster High line has become so popular that discount clones have finally hit the shelves.  D7ana alerted me to this six pack of Kid Connection dolls now available at Walmart.


***
It's been a rough week so Kayley is relieved to step into the shower and wash her cares away.


After changing into a pretty frock she stops to check her make up in the mirror over the sink.


Then she sits down to put on her shoes.


She can't wait to get to the new party lounge her friends are raving about and dance the night away.


Kayley is from the second wave of Midnight Magic dolls produced by the Lovely Patsy company.  These dolls have new outfits to share with Nefera de Nile.  The blow molded boots are the same but I cut them down to ankle boots to add some variety to the shoe options available for these big foot girls.  The new Midnight Magic dolls have more fluid click knees and their fingers are no longer splayed which should make it easier for them to don some of the Bratzillas fashions that Nefera has been keeping all to herself.

***
The club is jumping when Ulalume arrives.


Endora is already throwing down on the dance floor,


and Mircala is already on her second drink.


Endora spots Ulalume and sizes her up.


Mircala just sniffs.  "She can't hold a candle to me."


Ghouls throwing shade don't phase Ulalume.  "I feel lucky tonight."


Ulalume is one of Edgar Allan Poe's poems about the death of a beautiful woman.  I thought the name would be fitting for a zombie doll.  Carmilla and Mircala also have literary antecedents.  I named them after the vampire countess in Sheridan LeFanu's 1872 novel, Carmilla.  Darrin Stephens' mother-in-law in the "Bewitched" television series (1964-72) was named Endora, probably in reference to the biblical Witch of Endor who summoned the spirit of the prophet Samuel for King Saul (1st Book of Samuel 28:3-25).   My Endora was a Just Kidz Scary Fashion doll featured in a Philly Collector post earlier this summer.  I was able to upgrade Endora to a a Disney Classic Princess Mulan body that matched her fair complexion.  Unfortunately, I doubt I will find good complexion matches for most of the Kid Connection scary dolls since blue, green, and orange articulated bodies are hard to come by.

***
Zenobia got lucky early in the evening and has brought her prey back to her lair.


She plans to give him just what he deserves.


"How do you like that, big boy?"


"Ahhh...Don't stop," he moans in exquisite agony.


Like Ulalume and Mircala, Zenobia has been shopping in the Star Doll wardrobe.  These fashions fit their Chic Boutique bodies well because like the Star Dolls they are slimmer than Barbie.

***
While her peers fritter their time away dancing, Tituba has spent countless Friday evenings working late in her laboratory.  Tonight she is finally ready to run her experiement.  She throws a switch and steps back to recite the incantation.


The newly reborn creature's eyes flutter open.  "Mama?"  she murmurs.


"What have I wrought?" Tituba marvels.


Tituba's creature is a Gothic Girl Draculara clone from Dollar General.  She can wear many Bratz fashions.  I upgraded her big sister to a Monster High body.


The historical Tituba was a slave accused of practicing witchcraft during the 1672 Salem witch trials. The character Tituba plays a prominent role in Arthur Miller's play, The Crucible.  In 1955 Anne Petry published Tituba of Salem Village, a young adult novel about this fascinating character.  Tituba's ethnic origin is disputed since the Puritans did not make clear distinctions between African and Native American slaves but in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem, Maryse Conde developed a feminist re-interpretation of the story placing Tituba in the same jail cell with Hester Prynne, the adultress from Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel, The Scarlet Letter.

 À Bientôt

16 comments:

  1. Hello from Spain: in stores in my country there are also Monsters clones Mattel dolls. I really like the dress she's wearing Carmilla. The bathroom furniture are fabulous. You are very creative with the image of Zenobia and prey ... wow, wow. Great. All your girls are very stylish. Keep in touch

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    1. Hi Marta, thanks for your compliments. Carmilla's dress is a knock off of an early Monster High Frankie Stein fashion. It was the best of the bunch. The Mattel designers who create the MH play sets are awesome. Lagoona Blue's bathroom is a masterpiece!

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  2. I adored this post! (^_^) So much excellent information! Telling a story while weaving in facts, and doll details worked so well here! <3 Thank you for sharing!!

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    1. Thanks for your compliments Cat. I really enjoy your photo stories so coming from you the praise means a lot.

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  3. This is a great post. I don't really care to have any more monster dolls, but it is fun seeing yours in action. I enjoyed viewing the photos and reading the stories and facts.

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    1. Hi RoxanneRoxanne, Glad you enjoyed the post. The monster dolls bring out a side of me I didn't know I had. :-)

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  4. The dolls are fun and have such cute outfits. I especially enjoy your literary references to the women of "familiar spirits" :-)

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    1. Hi Grandmommy, literary references were the easiest way to pick names for all the characters.

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  5. First, thanks for the blog plugs ;-D

    Next, I enjoy how your posts join literature-history-popular culture with storytelling. So many different points to take and to respond to ;-)

    Love the literary references. I read Carmilla years ago. Need to re-read it - I only remember that she was a female vampire who re-arranged the letters of her name to other names. Do remember there are Hammer House of Horror movies based on that Le Fanu novel.

    I will add Anne Petry's "Titubia" and "I, Titubia"to my Must Read list, too.

    Thanks for this entertaining and informative post ;-)

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    1. Hi D7ana, Carmilla was the original lesbian vampire novel. Since then many other books and movies have taken up the same theme. "The Hunger" with Catherine Deneuve is one of the most memorable. Glad you enjoyed the post.

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  6. Buena opcion, supongo que seran mas economicas y espero, facil de adquirir. :-)

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    1. Hi Lindaivette, yes, the clones are much cheaper than Monster High dolls. The 6 pack of Scary Dolls from Walmart was about $20. The Just Kidz Scary Fashion Doll was $15 but she came with two changes of clothes and a wardrobe closet shaped like a coffin. The Midnight Magic dolls are $5 each.

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  7. Awesome post. I really need to take a closer look when I come across some clones. So many of them are partially articulated.

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    1. Hi Muff, the new Chic Boutique bodies are not up to the older twist and turn versions. The knees have a tendency to buckle when the doll is standing, the legs splay when they sit down and the arms only swing front and back, they don't extend to the side.

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  8. Son unas muñecas terrorificas!! Acabo de conocer tu blog y me ha encantado, me quedo como seguidora y de paso te invito al mio para que te pases cuando quieras, besos!!

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    1. Hi Marta, welcome to Limbe Dolls. I enjoyed the photos on your blog and have subscribed.

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